Volume 10, Issue 40 (2013)                   FSCT 2013, 10(40): 47-55 | Back to browse issues page

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The effect of primary, middle and final fermentation time on quantitative and qualitative properties of Barbari bread. FSCT. 2013; 10 (40) :47-55
URL: http://fsct.modares.ac.ir/article-7-9395-en.html
Abstract:   (4044 Views)
Fermentation process of bread includes primary, middle and final sections. If dough is prepared by the traditional methods and immediately formed, in addition to the more energy consumption, the proper shape of dough will be affected and final product may have compressed texture, less porosity and specific volume and lower flavor and taste scores. Where the three section of fermentation performed, because of equal distribution of gas, more elasticity and formation and aromatic compound, the product has more porosity and taste and flavor. By considering the importance of this issue, the purpose of this study was the effect of primary fermentation time in three levels of 10, 15 and 20 minute, middle fermentation time on three levels of 5, 10 and 15 minute and final fermentation time on three levels of 25, 35 and 45 minute on crumb firmness, porosity, specific volume and sensory properties of Barbari bread. After comparing treatment with fully randomized factorial in p<0.05, the results showed the lowest firmness, the highest porosity and specific volume and the best score in sensory analysis was attribute to samples with primary fermentation time of 30 minute and final fermentation time of 45 minute. As compared to these treatments the greatest effect on improving the quality of Barbari bread was attributing to the sample with middle fermentation time of 10 minute.
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Received: 2011/04/26 | Accepted: 2012/01/26 | Published: 2013/07/23

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