Volume 16, Issue 88 (2019)                   FSCT 2019, 16(88): 365-375 | Back to browse issues page

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Najaf Najafi M, Koolabadi Z, Rashidi H. Effect of quince seed mucilage on physicochemical, textural and sensory properties of vanilla ice cream. FSCT 2019; 16 (88) :365-375
URL: http://fsct.modares.ac.ir/article-7-22660-en.html
1- Associate Professor, Khorasan Razavi Agricultural and Natural Resources Research and Education Center, AREEO, Mashhad, Iran. , mnajafi.mhd@gmail.com
2- Khorasan Razavi Agriculture and Natural Resources Research and Education Center, AREEO, Mashhad, Iran.
3- Khorasan Razavi Agricultural and Natural Resources Research and Education Center, AREEO, Mashhad, Iran.
Abstract:   (3553 Views)
Plant seed mucilage is one of the most important hydrocolloids used in food industry due to the ability to create structure and texture, properties of emulsifying, thickness and dietary aspects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of quince seed mucilage replacement on physicochemical (pH, specific gravity, melting resistance and overrun), textural and sensory properties of vanilla ice cream. For this purpose, mucilage was used as a substitute for carboxy methyl ellulose in ice cream formulation at 5 levels (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100%). The results showed that with increasing replacement ratio, the amount of melting resistance, specific gravity and overrun significantly increased (p<0.05). Addition of mucilage did not have a significant effect on the pH of the ice cream mixture (p>0.05). Adding mucilage reduced hardness (p<0.05). Based on sensory evaluation results, adding mucilage increased the total acceptance of ice cream. In general, and considering all the characteristics, it can be concluded that the sample with 100% mucilage substitution had a higher quality than other treatments.
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Article Type: Original Research | Subject: Food formulations
Received: 2018/07/2 | Accepted: 2019/01/14 | Published: 2019/06/15

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