Volume 16, Issue 87 (2019)                   FSCT 2019, 16(87): 305-315 | Back to browse issues page

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1- Islamic Azad Univrsity Maku Branch
2- University of Tabriz , j_hesari@yahoo.com
3- University of Tabriz
4- Pegah Co.
5- Yüzüncü Yıl University
Abstract:   (4176 Views)
In this research, the effects of whey protein concentrate based edible coatings containing different concentrations of natamycin and lysozyme–xanthan gum conjugate were investigated. For this purpose, Escherichia coli O157:H7 (as an indicator for gram negative bacteria and also resistant to commercial pasteurization), Staphylococcus aureus (as an indicator of gram-positive bacteria), and Penicillium chrysogenum were inoculated to ultrafiltrated white cheese surface and the microbial properties of cheese samples were evaluated during 28 days storing. The results showed that all coated treatments significantly reduced the growth of Penicillium chrysogenum. Natamycin-containing coatings have been more effective in reducing the mold population than lysozyme-xanthan-containing coatings. Coated samples containing 600 ppm lysozyme-xanthan reduced E. coli O157: H7 growth 2.09 log compared to control samples. Also, the growth rates of Staphylococcus aureus were lower in all samples treated with lysozyme-xanthan than control sample. The lowest growth rate of Staphylococcus aureus was observed in the coated sample containing 600 ppm lysozyme-xanthan on 28th day, with a microbial population of 2.60 logarithms. Unlike other treatments, the growth rate of Staphylococcus aureus in the sample coated containing 600 ppm lysozyme-xanthan was descending over 28 days. The results of this study showed that whey protein based edible coating can be used as a carrier of natamycin and lysozyme-xanthan in optimal concentration, for increasing the microbial quality of UF cheese.
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Article Type: Original Research | Subject: Packing and all types of coatings in the food industry
Received: 2018/12/30 | Accepted: 2019/03/5 | Published: 2019/05/15

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